Airline staff

Daddy, why is that gate so narrow?

So people don’t take their big bags onto the aeroplane themselves, and they check them in to go in the cargo hold.

So the pilot can put them in the aeroplane?

Yes, the pilot needs to put them in the place underneath. Well the pilot has just one special job of flying the plane. Other people do other special jobs like that one. It actually takes a lot of people to help get us and our things to fly from one place to another.


I don’t love flying – and I reckon few people do – but I am still grateful for the people who make it possible. I spend some hours packing, getting the timing and the papers all right, lining up, waiting and then waiting some more. For that, I get to be somewhere else much faster than by other ways. They get a day’s pay, which I guess they consider a fair trade. I don’t know how many flights per week a cargo loader, air steward or pilot might do, or how often they meet that tiny number of passengers who make things difficult, or what they have to deal with behind the scenes. So, thank you. I have time to sit and feel grateful, because the kids are settled.

(This is actually from November 2015, but the words haven’t dated. I’m still grateful to sit still when the kids are settled, and to anyone who helps that happen!)

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Thank you, honest strangers

Life has been heavy going for the past year, more so than ever before. It’s had ups and downs, and yesterday was largely a down – I forgot too many things and failed to communicate with people properly so that only made things worse. Anyway, they were all very good about it and I’m lucky to have great caring people around me helping make it all work.

Today was better. I had time to get things done which will mercifully remain done. Washing, cleaning the chook cage, getting the kids to brush their teeth… have to be done again and again, but it’s good to make some progress on the backlog.

Anyway, to the title of the post: I dealt with two unfamiliar situations today, and both of them turned out more smoothly than I dared hope: Selling a low-value car, and shipping a kitchen appliance across the country to a Gumtree buyer with just-in-time (significant) payment of postage. Both of these have scam potential, certainly evidenced by a couple of the messages I’d received from potential buyers (or scammers). I reckon the best response is to treat everyone as if they’re honest, but take protective steps along the way, like taking photos of goods, explicitly discussing how things are happening, and recording relevant information. There’s no sense in being paranoid and putting people off side.

To cut a long story short, one person handed me cash, let me photograph their drivers licence and took away the car; another sent me the full agreed payment plus enough to cover relevant costs, and I no longer have these things cluttering up my life. To both of you, thank you. We drank champagne tonight for a few reasons, and you helped.

FreeBSD and pg_upgrade

Thank you kreynolds, your post makes my current job look dead easy. I want to upgrade PostgreSQL from 9.3.12 to 9.5.4, and after checking through all of the release notes between the two versions, I have narrowed the relevant ones down to the two biggest releases: 9.4 and 9.5 (thanks in part to our devs not using the darkest corners of PostgreSQL features… yet).

A side note: PostgreSQL is a shining example of how to do release notes. All in one place, linked properly between versions, available back as far as the eye can see, to pre-1.0 in the 1990s!

Another win for documentation: the FreeBSD handbook. Curated by members of the project, a simple URL, and quality information.

I could use pg_dumpall > backup.sql, upgrade the package, then psql -f backup.sql postgres, or do it in place faster with pg_upgrade. FreeBSD doesn’t simply allow both old and new packages to be installed together, so enter jails.

# jailroot=/usr/tmp/pg_upgrade
# bsdinstall jail $jailroot
# pkg -r $jailroot install postgresql93-server

In the dialog boxes, choose a nearby mirror and no extra components. Wait for the installation to complete.

# su pgsql -c 'pg_dumpall -c | bzip2' > /usr/tmp/pgdump.sql.bz2
# service puppet stop
# service postgresql onestop
# pkg delete postgresql93-client postgresql93-contrib postgresql93-server
# mv /usr/local/pgsql/data{,.93}
# pkg install postgresql95-client postgresql95-contrib postgresql95-server
# service postgresql oneinitdb
# pg_controldata -D /usr/local/pgsql/data.93

“Latest checkpoint location” needs to be the same on master and replication slaves. pg_upgrade(1) has good information on the 16 step process.

# su -l pgsql -c "pg_upgrade -b $jailroot/usr/local/bin -B /usr/local/bin -d /usr/local/pgsql/data.93 -D /usr/local/pgsql/data -j 16 -k --check"
Checking for reg* system OID user data types       fatal
Your installation contains one of the reg* data types in user tables.
These data types reference system OIDs that are not preserved by
pg_upgrade, so this cluster cannot currently be upgraded. You can
remove the problem tables and restart the upgrade. A list of the problem
columns is in the file:
    tables_using_reg.txt
[root@flora ~]# wc -l ~pgsql/tables_using_reg.txt 
 38 /usr/local/pgsql/tables_using_reg.txt

Bother. I can’t use pg_upgrade. Oh well, I’ll talk to the devs for next time, and get on with dump and restore.